On the other hand, the subject-verb disagreement is simply the absence of this agreement. One way to look at the issue is to deny a case of agreement. The subject of a sentence must match the verb of the sentence: so what is a 3-subject-verb disagreement? The verb applies to the subject of the patchwork, not to the sentence that modifies the subject, that is, has not, is correct: “The patchwork of federal and state regulations has left companies with great uncertainty about how to adhere to it.” Renée, I will give you a more difficult example: “The joint decision of the various federal courts of appeals of the United States of America. was it… »; instead of “. Were… Here we have many prepositional sentences between the subject of the phrase “to govern” and the verb “had been.” As far as the subject-verb correspondence is concerned, all these intermediate sentences (and also the dependent clauses) should be ignored. == If two options are presented as alternatives and not as a combination, with or instead of linking them, a singular verb is appropriate because it only applies to the first option: “The implementation of simplified solutions based on symptomatic causes, or a single cause if there are several interacting causes, will most likely end in failure and disappointment. Most languages have a common sequence of words like this: a) subject, verb, direct object. (b) Subject, direct object, verb. c) Verb, subject, direct object. Other things like indirect objects and adverbs vary from language to language. The usual sequence of words is quite mathematical and logical. When it comes to adjectives and adverbs, many people don`t seem to know that in English: a) adjectives, including articles, usually execute their nouns, but the attached prepositional strings usually follow them.

(A coral truck from the bottom of the sea.) b) Adverbs, including adverbial prepositional alhrases, generally follow their verbs. Exceptions can be found in which the adverb comes to the accent beforehand. This is how people who have their adverbs in front of them all the time “scream”. You might as well WRITE EVERYTHING IN CAPITAL LETTERS! In Latin languages such as Spanish, French, and Italian, adjectives usually follow their nouns, with the exception of articles. A great example of this is California**, where you will see many brands for “El Camino Real”. Well, “real” means “royal,” so it`s not about “real things.” It is “The Royal Highway” = “The Royal Highway” or even “The King`s Highway”. Both decisions cause problems if you don`t know what you`re doing. In #4, I don`t see how patchwork is a theme. The subject is federal and state regulations. Sometimes collective names can be particularly confusing. If a singular noun implies that there are several people, should the verb be singular or plural?! The answer is simple. The verb must always correspond to the written subject(s) (not implicit)..

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